´╗┐Alan Bardin paints




          Born in Milwaukee in 1951, Bardin spent his childhood trying to stay out of trouble in the
small village of Shorewood.  His parents encouraged him to play the piano but Bardin chose the electric guitar instead and played in a rock band.  Bardins' fascination with texture, shapes and colors landed him in the avant-guarde Layton School of the Arts.

     

              In 1970, Bardin enrolled in the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he majored in Psychology.  His interest was particularily piqued in the area of abnormal  psychology.                            

A self study....maybe............?



              With  diploma in hand Bardin entered the work force.   Like many psychology majors with hopes of being the next Freud, he found himself moving furniture, digging trenches and driving cab.   Through some self-introspection Bardin realized he had a problem with authority.  He thought he was it!   Realizing his dilemma and being hungry, he started his own small and successful painting business that has grown for the last 30 years.
His first genius "work of  art" was the now common commercial advertisement signs you see outside of buildings being painted.  Bardin started that advertising trend.  Now it is a common practice to advertise while you work.

            After thirty years of tinting paint, slinging a brush on walls, clapboard and plaster,
running around town, pleasing undecided customers and managing unruly employees
he wondered, "what's going on!!!!"


In his confusion he became intrigued with the random colors and designs of his weariest of old tarps.    Alan started painting images on these used up drop cloths.  His employees became worried when he began to have conversations with these creatures.  Being mocked and taunted by his fellow painters only drove Bardin deeper into his ranting and raving, often commanding these images to "sing".  It wasn't long until the painters realized these canvases were selling like hotcakes.


Today, Bardin continues to let these images pour forth from his imagination.  He finds great
pleasure and therapeutic value in bringing each of his characters to life.